Week 25 — Testing Boundaries and Other Projects

Testing Boundaries

I finally made the chop and decided to split the two projects growing out of the testing boundaries assignment.

Hesperus is Phosphorus now exists as an Email Exchange Project, with a new home on https://www.hesperusisphosphorus.space/ where the audience can ‘subscribe’ to the daily emails. I updated the description:

Hesperus is Phosphorus sends you a morning star each day just before dawn while Venus is Phosphorus, and an evening star each evening just before dusk while Venus is Hesperus.

To sign up, please do so through the Subscribe tab.

Questioning how proprioception (internal perception which tells us what is going on in our bodies) is related to exteroception (external or sensory perception, everything outside of our bodies), leads to new interpretations of how the knowledge of something could be empirical (a posterioi, or verifiable by observation and experience) rather than knowable (a proiri, or independent of experience like mathematics, and deduction from pure reason). Debating the validity of both scientific and personal interpretations as valid means for knowing.

Everything above, and everything within provides us with the desire and the means to learn more.

The other compnent of the project, the actual star drawing exchange has grown to become Asterism Exchange and is ultimately the work I will share at Flourish Festival in April 2019. The online archive of drawings continues to grow daily at https://www.asterismexchange.xyz/

It’s description has been updated:

Focusing on myths of counting the stars as means of understanding the cosmos, and ourselves, this project has set out on the hopeless and endless task of counting and identifying all the stars. Each day one star is posted with the futile hope of cataloguing every star in the night sky one day.

All together the work becomes an ever growing digital collage, counting all the stars in the sky, making them touchable, in familiar materials and personifying them the way early cultures did to make the night sky knowable.

To be a part of this project and add to the growing archive, you can contribute a star of your making through the submit tab.

I have also made postcards for the submissions to be made on, and a small zine explaining the project. I will give away this zine, and one of my hand drawn or printed stars, in exchange for an audience submission. I see this as a very physical exchange of a gift, an acknowledgement of work, and the importance of looking and recreating as a way of coming to know the cosmos.

I will update again after the performance/collaboration happens.

1.PNG

2.PNG

45


Personal Uranographia

Along side the testing boundaries I have been working on a book/map work that is using embossed paper to recreate the pattern of stars in the night sky.

these pages will be assembled to create a large fold out map, about 40″ x 80″ with an accompanying audio component.

I have used a contact mic to record my heart beat for 115mins, to account one beat for every star visible in the night sky. A tiny bluebooth speaker will play this audio embedded into the cover of the work.

Exploring embodied connections to understanding the cosmos, by translating the astronomical and relating the cosmos to the human scale, the work could play on loop to account for every star…

“We are the local embodiment of a Cosmos grown to self-awareness. We have begun to contemplate our origins: starstuff pondering the stars; organized assemblages of ten billion billion billion atoms considering the evolution of atoms; tracing the long journey by which, here at least, consciousness arose. Our loyalties are to the species and the planet. We speak for Earth. Our obligation to survive is owed not just to ourselves but also to that Cosmos, ancient and vast, from which we spring.” — Carl Sagan

IMG_6087.jpg


Seven Sisters

I’ve been preparing to hang an exhibition at the Charlotte Street Arts Center in Fredericton NB from 12 April to 6 May.

I will be hanging the Seven Sisters Banners, giving away a zine with the seven poems and seven cyanotypes, and providing a qr code to link to the web project.

Its just been a time of figuring out hanging mechanisms, folding zines, and ensuring that the web component will be finished in time. It can be seen in progress at sevensisters.space.

 

Advertisements

Week 26 — Intersections and Articulations Response

Listening to the audio files this week, I really appreciated hearing from both an artists and an arts facilitator. Listening to their talks I was interested in how they both defined clear guidelines of what they do, and clear guidelines of what outcomes they expect from those actions. I often feel that many of us starting out are expected to work as both the artist and the administrator, and it is encouraging to hear how those roles can be separated and supported, while both work towards similar goals.

Insite Arts

Emphasizing creating briefs that offer interesting opportunities for artists and making room for artistic freedoms in commissions really gets to a productive relationship between client and artists. I feel like there are so many times when larger corporations put out briefs simply looking to fill office spaces, when a much more exciting opportunity for artists could be possible.

Giving artists the space and time to develop new work is really special, and allowing space and time for their research to grow in unexpected ways while exploration new ideas is such a rich way to use they opportunity.

It reminded me of how the BMO Projects Room operates as an experimental commission space in their head offices works within a corporate mandate, but produces a wide variety of artistic investigations. Projects like these activate spaces that are often neglected but full of opportunities and allows the artists a chance to considers and researched the specific community, especially when it is not their own.

https://canadianart.ca/reviews/roula-partheniou-3/

RoulaPartheniou-CupAndBall-Installationview-1024x700.jpg
Roula Partheniou, Cup and Ball, 2018. Lacquer and acrylic on wood. Installation view at BMO Project Room. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.
a-suitable-den-0021-2048w.jpg
Graeme Patterson, A Suitabe Den, 2016. Installation view at BMO Project Room.

I really appreciated how they talked about having clear expectations of support for the artists from everyone involved in the project. This is so often over looked, but really essential so that everyone working toward the project is on the same page.

Alexa Cox

From the artists perspective, Alexa seemed to focus on situating herself/the artist as story teller, and that by being clear and purposeful with her research and work, her artistic practice really grew.

By developing a clear visual language, it seemed that she was able to reduce the amount of information being presented through her work, and that actually made it clearer for the audience, while still sharing the same ideas through her work.

By integrating research outside of art theory; stories, anthropology and poetics of space and journeys and researching through drawing, experimentation through action and freedom and making connections she was able to create a larger more complex story in  her work. By clearly outlining all these ideas and research through writing, Venn diagrams and mind mapping, her ideas about the work started to match up with audience interpretations.

I also really appreciated how she did not avoid meandering from her initial path, letting it lead to new discoveries/connections in the reflections, and used that learning to make something else. She seemed to use this philosophy to challenge everything she is making and event challenge expectations of a media.

I think these ideas of being very very clear and purposeful with the work, but also allowing room for research, experimentation and risk at the right time are really useful to carry forward in my work. Writing to make everything crystal clear will help with my expectations of the work, but also the expectations of the people I am collaborating and working with to see these projects come to life.

Week 24 – Testing Boundaries (Week 13)

Testing Boundaries Summary (So Far)$RTR0MXE.png

$R1WYE0B.PNG

hesperusisphosphorus.space

Project Statement

Hesperus is Phosphorus posts a morning star each day just before dawn while Venus is Phosphorus, and an evening star each evening just before dusk while Venus is Hesperus.

Focusing on myths of counting the stars as means of understanding the cosmos, and ourselves, this project has set out on the hopeless and endless task of counting and identifying all the stars. In about 12 years, the 9000 stars we can see with the naked eye will be accounted for.

Questioning how proprioception (internal perception which tells us what is going on in our bodies) is related to exteroception (external or sensory perception, everything outside of our bodies), leads to new interpretations of how the knowledge of something could be empirical (a posterioi, or verifiable by observation and experience) rather than knowable (a proiri, or independent of experience like mathematics, and deduction from pure reason). Debating the validity of both scientific and personal interpretations as valid means for knowing.

Everything above, and everything within provides us with the desire and the means to learn more. This browser based and email subscription work acts as a visual representation of internal perception of the body as a way of seeing externally perceived perceptions of the night sky. finding a connection between the personal and the common, the understandable and the inexplicable, along with the macro and the micro.

All together the work becomes an ever growing digital collage, counting all the stars in the sky, personifying them, the way early cultures did to make the night sky knowable.

“Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe the more often and more enduringly reflection is occupied with them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.” — Immanuel Kant

Submission Component

To be a part of this project, anyone can contribute through the submit tab or at live events. The Live events, and the browser based work are really about the exchange, playing with ideas of ownership, interpretation and building something larger (the complete archive) by working together to amass an almost unbelievable about of stars.

Subscription Component

$RPZFQ9O.png

The email subscription component mirrors these ideas, but participants receive a morning star in their inbox each morning just before dawn while Venus is Phosphorus, and an evening star each evening just before dusk while Venus is Hesperus.

The project is customized to the participants’ time zone. As a thank you for participating, I send each subscriber a hand drawn star in the mail as a physical connection to the project.

This part of the project has ultimately become a bit separated in a way. It is really linked through time, and following the Hesperus and Phosphorus cycles of Venus.

Reception

I did not realize that tumblr, upon which the project is built does not track analytics, but I have added a google analytics script, and will be able to track visits more closely to the page.

The email subscription has a few subscribers, but I have been applying to share the project through other online spaces, and at the live event, and hopefully that will increase reception.

Venues

Confirmed:

  • Charlotte Street Art Centre – exhibition 12 April to 6 May
  • Flourish Festival – Performances 26 and 27th

Applied for:

  • ThidShift Festival
  • Art in the Open
  • Peer to Space
  • GAG
  • the Wrong
  • Nocturne

Preparations for Live Component

  • Creating Post card for submisions
  • instillation plan with projection of browser based work and ephemera
  • take on role of archivist – white gloves, blazers

THISISNOWHERE.online

$RGMVHMU.PNG

I decided to also establish an online artist-run-centre to promote net.art and new media online to fill the gap in Canadian online programming I currently see.

Mandate: The mission of THISISNOWHERE.ONLINE is to establish a venue for, and promote forward-thinking contemporary art through an ongoing series of digital projects presented online. Highlighting values of Accessibility, Leadership and Collaboration, emerging Canadian artists are invited to temporarily commandeer its online space to share or create work.

Execution: Over the next three years, secure funding/partners for server space and web hosting, develop a program of exhibitions, social media and physical presence through occasional irl exhibitions in partnership with external venues.

Overarching Goals of all these projects

The project exists as a browser based digital collage, and as a email art project to promote a democratic art environment for all participants, free of instructional hierarchies, creating an art environment for everyone regardless of educational background or geographical location. Of course, the internet does come with limitations as a site for artwork, but the possibility of reaching a diverse audience is much wider than any physical location.

Browser based works present the unique opportunity to connect with a non-localized audience, who may participate in near complete anonymity, solitude, or participate actively as an individual or as in group. Screen culture is constantly growing and has changed how we communicate with each other, how we understand, look for truths and how we disseminate and understand ideas. Online work presents a unique opportunity for artists to connect directly to audiences virtually without the mediation of physical institutions and to move away from traditional art centers. This also presents an opportunity to make space for marginalized or underrepresented groups to be heard (similar to zine and print culture) and can act a counter culture.

The internet has undeniably changed how we receive all forms of written, verbal and visual communications. The spaces we occupy on the internet have become a social construct, with set of habits and social practices that have changed how think about reality. Audiences act and communicate differently online than in person and it allows our voices to reach farther than ever before, but this also causes a process of detachment. This detachment between our online life and physical life can makes people behave differently in online spaces meaning our audience online and in person is not the same, even if they are the same people. In this project I hoped to connect the digital and the physical in some way as a means of recognizing our digital presence as real.
With browser and social media based works it is possible to Reach a much more wide audience than in traditional brick and mortar institutions. However still only certain demographics with access to the internet due to economic means.

These ideas of connectivity, immateriality linked to materiality and democracy embodied by internet based projects move away from traditional and commercial artistic institutions goals, endlessly opening up the opportunities for new interpretations of the work. This type of work is rhizomatic, and we can lead the new connections – if we want to.

 

Week 23 – Testing Boundaries (Week 12)

The last few weeks have felt like most of my time has been spent mostly doing administrative work to keep the testing boundaries project (Hesperus is Phosphorus) going. It have been taking a huge amount of time to prepare all the images, and schedule them, but now the next three years are automated.

I am curious to see how this project will work on a sort of auto pilot, and how soon I will want to change something about it, upgrade the technology or if the technology may fail me.

I have been sending out proposals for the work to be featured on online exhibition venues, but I am also content with it as a project that will just grow slowly over time, or that anyone could find in a few years and it will still be running and hopefully relevant.

In applying and proposing to these online venues I did find that many had very specific mandates (Only gifs, only downloads, etc) and that many of the curated online exhibitions which interested me, we not showing exclusively work made in a media intended for the internet.

From these observations I have decided to establish an online artist-run-centre, THISISNOWHERE.ONLINE (read: this is no where or this is now here, as per one of the best Neil Young albums ever) to promote net.art and new media online to fill the gap in Canadian online programming I currently see. This space can support and present the work of emerging digital artists, or act as a space for establish artists working in other media to experiment with an online platform.

The mandate of THISISNOWHERE.ONLINE is to establish a venue for, and promote forward-thinking contemporary art through an ongoing series of digital projects presented online. Highlighting values of accessibility, experimentation and collaboration, emerging and established artists are invited to temporarily commandeer its online space to share or create work.

My partner/co-curator in the project Jacob Puffer and I are offering the technical support to put these projects out, and develop an online audience for the works. We have invited two emerging Canadian new media artists to submit a project each for the launch April 1.

thisisnowhere.PNG
THISISNOWHERE.ONLINE

 

Week 22 – Contextual Study & Testing Boundaries (Week 11)

Contextual Study + Biography so far…

Question

How ‘subjective’ visual interpretations and internal perception created through the translation of ‘objective’, scientific information to a new medium alter and expand our understanding of the world

Key Words

Contemporary Art, Archives, Metaphysics, Objectivity, Subjectivity, Knowledge and Perception.

Abstract

My aim within this contextual study is to offer an analysis of where my practice sits within contemporary art practices and in relation to theories of perception. Through Kant’s writing I question how proprioception (internal perception which tells us what is going on in our bodies) is related to exteroception (external or sensory perception, everything outside of our bodies) and leads to new interpretations of how the knowledge of our world could be both empirical and subjective. Debating the validity of both scientific and personal interpretations as valid means for knowing, I look at the way Mark Dion and I use the scientific language of archives to subvert the authority of purely empirical knowledge. I argue that the practical and creative translation of scientific information through artistic practice, makes space for different kinds of knowledge to be considered valid, especially those form underrepresented populations, and to be accepted in congruence with the dominant objective and authoritative empirical ideas.

Outline

Scientific reasoning has deduced answers for much uncertainty previously felt in the world using empirical data, but there is still a large gap in human understanding of ourselves, and the universe we inhabit which may be explained through subjective interpretations. Debates over the importance of these two modes of perception have been a topic of debate in metaphysics, ethics and philosophy since the beginning of scientific practice, and often questioned in artistic practices.

In Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason, 1781, he analyses the relationship between human experience and reasoning for the world around us, by questioning how perception, both proprioception and exteroception, are used to decipher human experience (Matherne 2016). He argues that using empirical a posterioi perception, verifiable through observation and experience, along with knowable a proiri perception, independent of experience deduction from pure reason, leads to more complete interpretations of human knowledge and experience (Kant 1781:523). Artist have taken these same ideas and through metaphors, (Guyer 1994:282) represented how by understanding our external world through our bodies, we can subsequently learn more about ourselves.

Exemplifying these ideologies, Mark Dion’ practice examines the ways public institutions and the dominant ideologies they promote make up our understanding of the natural world, its history and the knowledge surrounding it while destabilizing the associated cultural hierarchies (111 Blazwick). His work subverts dominant scientific culture, challenging the audience’s perception of how they know the world around them by using ordering systems which mimic the ways our mind orders information (Marshall 2005:237) in contrast to the way empirical analysis orders the same information. Through the use of the visual language of archives, archeology and other scientific methods of collecting and recording data Dion questions the distinctions between so called ‘rational’ scientific methods and ‘irrational’, subjective influences (Art:21, 2007).

In my own practice I aim to subvert the authority of purely empirical knowledge by overlapping scientific interpretations along side poetic, mythological and magical explanations of the night sky. Arguing that the practical and creative translation of scientific information through artistic practice, makes space for non-dominant knowledge to be considered valid, especially those form underrepresented populations (Lipkin, 2014:72)., and to be accepted in congruence with the dominant objective and authoritative ideas from prevailing institutions. Interpreting the cosmos through representations related to the human body and embodying the poetic ideas that we are made of the same matter as the stars, my practice aims to take something as unknowable as the ever-expanding cosmos and make it knowable, if only in part through touch, scale and embodiment.

Grappling with large ideas and extensive data used to explain human perception and making it palpable through theory and artistic practice, multiple interpretations of the same experience can exist simultaneously and enrich our ability to grasp the world around us, physically, conceptually, and emotionally.

Bibliograpy

Blazwick, I. (2001) Mark Dion’s “Tate Thames Dig”. Oxford Art Journal 24, no. 2 (2001): 105-12. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3600411.

Dion, M. (2007). Art21: Art in the Twenty-First Century. PBS Home Video. Retrieved Feb 10, 2019 from https://art21.org/artist/mark-dion/

Guyer, P. (1994) Kant’s Conception of Fine Art. The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52, no. 3 (1994): 275-85. doi:10.2307/431427.

Kant, I (1998) Critique of Pure Reason. (Paul Guyer and Allen Wood Eds. and Trans.). Cambridge University Press. http://strangebeautiful.com/other-texts/kant-first-critique-cambridge.pdf

Lipkin, L. (2014) What Galileo Saw: Imagining the Scientific Revolution. New York: Cornell University Press.­­­­

Marshall, J. (2005) Connecting Art, Learning, and Creativity: A Case for Curriculum Integration, Studies in Art Education, 46:3, 227-241, DOI: 10.1080/00393541.2005.11650076

Matherne, S. (2016). Kant’s Theory of the Imagination. In Amy Kind (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge. https://philarchive.org/rec/MATKTO-5

Questions to keep thinking about:

  • The stories and theories that concern the cosmos / the night sky speak of all sorts of unknowns and inconceivable ideas and questions of unknowns, hopes, myths, existentialism, untouchable potentials……. What does it mean to digest the immense and yet everyday nature of something so present for everyone – as practice.
  • what type of understanding you hope to provide and what in turn that might enable
  • There are the possible articulations of how we grapple with something so extensive and make it palpable and by MAKING it exist differently that we can grasp at it physically, conceptually or potentially emotionally.
  • interpreting, translating, making meaning, questioning knowledge, reframing information, curating the night sky.

Feedback

  • include examples
  • clearly define uncommon terms
  • include more of my own opinion of the question
  • be clear about how I am using this thesis in my own work

Testing Boundaries

While shifting my focus the last few weeks a bit more to the contextual study, I was not surprised that my time spent doing more reading, would have an impact on my studio work as well. Anything I read I want to think about if it is relevant to my practice, and if it is not, but seems important to consider, how might it be integrated into practice, with this work, or future projects.

At this point in the Testing Boundaries timeline though, I think the project is established, with most technical and conceptual kinks worked out, so it would be best to focus on finding the online audience and measuring their engagement.

I have received a few subscribers for the email component and visitors from Canadian and European IP addresses to the browser based work, but how do I reach outside of the people I already know?

I am going to apply to present this work a various online festivals to hopefully broaden its reach. Here are a few I am working on:

 

 

 

 

 

Week 21 – Making Day & Testing Boundaries (Week 10)

I have been spending so much time at the computer, working out kinks for the Testing Boundaries assignment, that I wanted to take the time during the making day to do something physical.

I have had this project in the back of my mind and sketch books for a while, to use an embossing tool to copy out a map of the night sky. Thinking about how we might know the cosmos better by touching it, I wanted to make a map that could be touched, making the patterns felt and maybe known in some other ways.

emboss1emboss 2IMG_5683

I tested the embossing tool with a number of different paper before settling for a rag somerset, photocopied and reversed a star catalogue and set to the task. It was time consuming, to do just 4 of the 32 pages tool the entire making day, but the results were just what I had in mind. Though as I was working my overall ideas to the projected shifted. I had set out with plans of an accordion book, but what if it was an oversized map, that took up a whole table that multiple people could touch at the same time? What if there was an audio component to the work? How would I incorporate that?

Lots to keep doing and thinking about…


Testing Boundaries

In the last week of the testing Boundaries assignment I worked out the logistics of the email exchange and finalized the website.

https://www.hesperusisphosphorus.space/ is now running daily, there are no logos or domain issues, and the next 2 months of posts are scheduled. I am really please with how the project changes each day, growing steadily to make something bigger that I could in one go.

The email exchange is also set to run daily, with participants receiving a morning star in their inbox each morning just before dawn while Venus is Phosphorus, and an evening star each evening just before dusk while Venus is Hesperus.

I asked them to include their address when signing up so I can customize the project to their time zone and as a thank you for participating, I have sent them each a hand drawn star.Screen Shot 2019-02-19 at 9.21.55 AMIMG_5713IMG_5686.PNG

Taking Les’s suggestions from the tutorial I found a way to use mail-chimp to automate emails, and incorporate different time zones when they signup for the project.

Screen Shot 2019-02-19 at 12.49.16 PM

Also from Les’ listening suggestions, I think the project would be strengthened by relating the email project and online to the 9 month cycles of Venus. Right now Venus is Phosphorus, meaning it appears to us as the morning star until it switches the the evening star (Hesperus) on August 14th 2019. On that date the project will switch from sending emails just before sunrise, to just before dusk.

The emails are linked the the recipients time zones and automated to send out by me through set sunrise and sunset times I have found through TimeandDate.com. The emails could act to draw attention to our circadian rhythms, or lack there of, through a digital intermediate.

How to people find it:

I think the project is mostly complete, through it will continue to change indefinitely, the format is set and accessible through https://www.hesperusisphosphorus.space/

Screen Shot 2019-02-19 at 12.48.47 PMScreen Shot 2019-02-19 at 12.51.37 PM

To direct visitors to the site, I have updated my website, created social media posts that will role out once a week as a reminder of the project and to document the changes.

I would like the project to reach further than the people I already know through my networks, and wonder which per-existing networks I may be able to tap into to broaden the project. I plan to email the link/description to the cohort, and astronomy related groups whose contact information I can find online.

Still to do:

Edit design of site to comply with WCAG 2.0 buy increasing contrast of text, adding an accessibility editing bar, and including a visual description.

Week 19 – Tutorial + Testing Boundaries (Week 8)

In preparing for my tutorial with Les, it was a great opportunity to reflect on what i have been actually doing, and what I hope to convey, ahead of discussing the Testing Boundaries project with him.

Reflecting on the work I found these questionable for myself and him:

  • Where doe the similarity between the name Phosphorous and the work phosphene, the scientific name for when you have stars in your vision, come from and how might it actually be an important connection for this project?
  • How can I connect this understanding of the cosmos, which as a time scale that is practically comprehensible, to something within a human scale and time scale? Should the projects actually last as long as an average human life?
  • What ethics are involved with using these images? Culturally, scientifically?
  • Changing domain name to HesperusisPhosphorus.space ?
  • Make form for submissions – online and physical?
  • I have been thinking about how work is put out to an audience in a meaning full way? Instagram? Mail exchange?
  • How to garner online audience? Post to other websites, self promotion, tie into irl events

Ahead of the tutorial Les sent this radio broadcast: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0001rm1 which sparked a new onslot of ideas and connections.

In the actual tutorial we discussed the scale of the project and how the time based element is linked to my subject matter for the testing boundaries assignment, and how I might tighten this connection even more through the realization that Venus’s cycles are the same length as a human gestation period.

We are discussed how working with systems and archives/categorization strategies is a part of the work itself. I have recently realized I have always enjoyed working in this way, and that is ok. From these ways of working I am always finding etymological connections (from astrophysics, philosophy, poetry, lore, etc) , leading in to new ways of looking at the subject matter. Les through these connections could be a project in itself or a part of another, drawing out all the connections I am finding is worth exploring.
Most of the discussion revolved around the the actual means of delivery to the audience, arguably the most important part of this task, which I have hmm and hawed over extensively. There are so many possibilities within internet based work, that finding the most effective means of reaching an audience has taken me some trial an error. I started a social media aspect of it, and cut that, favoring the design freedom I have with a browser based work, but we also discussed how the project should reach the audience every day – maybe it should be an email subscription, where an audience could sign up to receive a star each dawn and dusk? I think so!, but how to make it happen?

————————————————————————————————————————————–

Next Steps:

  • Keep working, keep reading: work out logistics of creating an email list, and how it might be linked to the subscriber’s time zone
  • See if I know anyone with app development experience – this would be an ideal medium
  • Look up/ Read: about On Kawara’s systematic practice, use the archives HUB to discover similar projects or look at other formats, dark matter, more philosophy of perception in relation to astrophysics.
  • consider importance of the exchange, the gift in the project
  • during the live performance, consider how to track where the gifted drawings go, and potentially where the images given to the project are from